Models, Chapter 2: Just Another Mystery

November 5, 2014 Comments (0)

By Marshall Buck

I’m sure that if I ever had to plan out all the steps from start to finish, or even attempt to do so, I would be as solidly frozen in my tracks as “Ötzi the Iceman”. So, I compartmentalize all the steps, focusing on one at a time, and create many sub steps as I go along, starting with the main big basics, which everything else must fit to and work with. Each model build is unique and has numerous differing requirements. In this instance I started with (1) the body, (2) chassis, (3) interior, (4) main area of the engine bay, and (5) trunk. However, mixed in with those majors are many little bits; very many little parts affect the fit of the big ones, and the big ones affect the little ones… It’s just one vicious circle, and sometimes enough to drive me to watch reruns of American Chopper to see what size hammer they’ll use to fit everything with—I always feel better after watching how they attempt to finesse their builds.

With any scale model that is extensively detailed, and then has opening panels too, you have to walk a very fine line between exacting detail, scale accuracy, and actual functionality and strength of the model. This is especially critical with regard to wall thickness of panels, all major attachment points, and any working features. I have nightmares about making hinges so true to the real ones that they disintegrate after their first use by the customer. Therefore, I make mine to look the part, but build them to last for at least a week after the check clears.

Once the chassis was made and fitted to the body and various attachment points made, and the main interior tub was made… more headaches began. Cue the theme music from JAWS. Yes, just when I thought it was safe… That’s when, once again (you’d think I would have learned already), trying to make dimensionally and visually accurate parts collided with tolerances of thickness, strength, and how the damn thing was going to fit and stay together. Problems easily solved; I took a lesson from the boys at American Chopper and just used a bigger hammer to make it all fit… well… not really, but some ‘adjustments’ were required. The result is it all looks correct, and great if I do say so myself.

With a model like this 250 SWB, which has to be so accurate, I have to continuously make countless detail decisions and factor in what will eventually be seen or buried once it is all complete. I don’t like to cut corners, but I also don’t like to waste time with something that will just not be seen or appreciated. A perfect example of that is the radiator. The top portion will be very visible, but sides front and back will not—so I went to town on what will be seen and appreciated, which now brings me back to why the hell did I go so far with making the chassis? Just another mystery of life.

Having progressed with many parts and additional body work such as cutting and fitting opening panels, adding of lips/channels along the inside edges of the engine bay and trunk openings, framework added to lids of engine and trunk… It was time to make all the hinges. I thought the doors and hood would be the most difficult—that however was not the case, they went well, and the trunk hinges which I thought would be easy were anything but. I still get the shakes when I think about it for too long. Multiple hinges and attachment points were made and thrown out over the course of a few days until I finally gave in to making appropriate scale placement adjustments. JAWS music is on a continuous loop in my workshop.

Next time… Chrome plating, detail parts, wheels & tires, and JAWS part twelve!

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

All open, and some of the files used for fine tuning to finish shaping of all openings.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

The beginning of fabricating lips/channels inside trunk edges.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

The beginning of making the sculpted raised side vent openings. Draw on body, trace over, transfer tracing to material for vent, cut rough shape, sculpt-form-shape with files and sand papers, test fit, add raised layer, sculpt & sand more, test fit again, spray primer, fix any imperfections, send out with body to painter. This is done for each of the four vents.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Finished primed vent edge openings, ready for final paint.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Trunk lid prop rod and support - 6 little parts.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

The finished and installed prop rod. Yes, it pivots.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

One of numerous fittings of interior in midst of fabrication.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Various major and other parts being made & fitted.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

JAWS continues. Making the trunk hinges starts.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Some of the discarded trunk hinges.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Success, JAWS is dead. Final trunk hinges and attachment points determined.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Vent edge openings installed as well as inner portions with cutouts, each one specific to each of the four side vents. These were all painted separately. I attached each after body was painted & polished.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Roughed out radiator on mini mill. Measured markings drawn on top for indents to be milled.

Model: Ferrari 250 SWB – Chapter 2

Finished radiator ready to install, though cap still needs to be made, and hoses will of course be fitted.

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