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Posted on November 21, 2014 Comments (0)

NASCAR: Harvick is Worthy Champion

Harvick and Tony Stewart

Let’s get something straight from the beginning. These guys are good. It is too easy to overlook their talent and skills in what week after week looks like a high speed crash fest. But those cars are fast and finicky. They are always skating on the edge of control and the winning drivers are those who can best balance the changes to track and tire conditions and pick their spots to pass and avoid wrecks. Their two road races at Watkins Glen and Sears Point are easily among the best races on TV every year. These guys are very good.

Harvick is a worthy Champion! He has paid his dues. And he won the championship by winning the race. He came into the sport with Childress Racing as a replacement for Earnhardt senior in 2001. He was expected to become the “new” intimidator. But the sport was changing and the days of the brawny brawlers were over. Jeff Gordon and Jimmy Johnson were the new style of champion and, though Harvick was edgy, he wasn’t winning championships. This year he joined Stewart–Haas Racing and with a new team and a new crew chief things came together.

Nascar Harvick Edwards fight

NASCAR ratings are up! NASCAR brass is taking a bow! Yes, it was their genius new format that did it, and the drivers agree. It must be so. Mainstream TV news which seemingly ignores anything but stick and ball games all year, but never misses a fire, a car crash or a baby falling out of a window, actually showed the pushing and shoving in two of the final four races and called it a “brawl”. THAT boosted ratings. As for the contenders appearing more motivated, eh, it’s possible that was merely frustration at having to contend for a title in a format that favors luck as much as skill.

F1: Finale will only be mildly interesting, then again…

Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

After a long season of drama based as much on personality clashes as good racing, it boils down to this: If Hamilton’s car doesn’t fail or crash, he will be World Champion. And Rosberg will be second and Ricciardo will be third. But who will be fourth? Only four points separate Vettel, Alonso and Bottas and while everyone will be cheering on their favorite driver, the pressure from the teams will be enormous as each point earned represents huge dollars at year end.


MMR Classifieds

Jaguar XK150

We only list the top 500 Classified cars for sale by dealers around the world. This week's featured marque is Jaguar.


MMR Goods & Services Directory

Pete Lyons Photographs of Can-Am

Every week we feature one company from the MMR Goods and Services Directory. This week’s featured supplier is Pete Lyons – Photographer. MMR is lucky to have this Can-Am image and this one too in our World Headquarters and they are a source of endless pleasure.


Michael Furman Photography

Michael Furman's image this week is from his book, The Art and Colour of General Motors and shows the detailed beauty of a 1934 LaSalle.

Michael Furman's image this week is from his book, The Art and Colour of General Motors and shows the detailed beauty of a 1934 LaSalle.


Sandy on Assignment

Sandy Cotterman, London Concours de Elegance 2014

This week’s story and images are by Sandy Cotterman and are from the London Concours of Elegance. Held on the grounds of the Hampton Court Palace on the September 5-7 weekend, the setting is in many ways reminiscent of Villa d’Este in Italy.

Peter Bourassa


Le Mans 1971

Posted on May 29, 2014 Comments (1)

by Michael Keyser

Here are a few more [photographs of the Daytona]. One is just after the race with people crawling on the car. Not sure if you know the story, but the car was driven by Luigi Chinetti, Jr. and Bob Grossman. They finished 5th and thought they’d won the GT class … until the French did some slight of hand. Somehow, the ACO decided the Ferrari wasn’t a GT car and awarded the class win to the 911S that finished 6th and was driven by … guess … two Frenchmen.

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser


Classic & Sports Car Subscription Offer

Posted on October 30, 2013 Comments (0)

Get Curves of Steel by Michael Furman FREE with your subscription!

In April 2007, The Phoenix Art Museum presented 22 landmark cars that illustrated the evolution of style and aerodynamics from the 1930s to the '90s. Curves of Steel, published by Coachbuilt Press, catalogues the exhibition.

Curves of Steel by Michael Furman

Edited and co-written by historian Jonathan A Stein, this lavish publication includes essays by Beverly Rae Kimes, Ken Gross, Phil Patton and Richard Adatto. Each car is presented with historic images and modern studio photographs by Michael Furman.

Curves of Steel by Michael Furman

Curves of Steel by Michael Furman

You can receive this book free when you subscribe to Classic & Sports Car - bringing you 12 months of the best European classic car magazine in the world with over 230 pages each month. Shipped directly to your door from England. Both for $79.

Classic & Sports Car logo

Curves of Steel by Michael Furman


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on October 18, 2013 Comments (3)

F1 - The Japanese GP

Webber out-qualified Vettel and started on pole. Vettel never passed Webber because he didn’t have to. The team changed Webber to a three stop strategy, one more than Vettel, and he finished second. It should be very clear to Ricciardo that he will be the new Webber. The deck gets reshuffled next year and based on past history it would be foolish to believe that Renault will not have a competitive engine for the Lotus and Red Bull chassis. Kimi is quick but he is also impatient. If Ferrari doesn’t supply a winning package for Kimi they may learn to dread his après race interviews.

IndyCar Fontana Finale Saturday @ 8:00PM ET

The Auto Club Speedway two-mile oval at Fontana will be the site of the final race of this year. It should be an interesting cap to a season that has seen exciting races and the emergence of a number of competitive teams and attractive drivers. The organization is still young and some of the tracks they use are less than ideal, but they do race and ten different drivers have won.

Petit Le Mans – ALMS Series Finale at Road Atlanta Saturday @ 11:00AM

The final race of the year and the final race in its history. Our man Tommy Kendall is 23 on the grid in the fastest Viper. Next year the ALMS and Grand-Am series will combine. The ungainly titled TUDOR United SportsCar Championship will hopefully bring together two organizations that have struggled for years to bring sports car racing to North America. Good luck.

Memories: Racing in the Sixties

With my meager savings and different sponsors every year, I managed to race little English sports cars for the first three years of my twenties. When I went for a loan to finance the fourth, my bank manager pointed out that, among other things, like collateral, I lacked talent. That was the end of a racing career full of promises. But I wasn’t through with racing.

From Monday morning thru Thursday at 5:00PM every week, I was a regular Champion Spark Plug Co. Sales Representative calling on service stations throughout the Province of Quebec and sticking Champion decals on doors and windows. On weekends, I put Champion decals on the cars, motorcycles, and boats of racers that carried our products. My task was to help the real Champion Spark Plug techs who, with their diagnostic tools and years of experience, were occupied with potential winners. If you were not a potential winner, (read: poor) I helped you. And god helped you too.

Fortunately we blew up very few engines. Please keep in mind that blowing up engines was not a rare occurrence in those days and melted plugs weren’t either.

At the time, I shared a ski house with a good bunch of people near the Mont Tremblant race track so I was in that area almost every weekend of the year. When the F1 teams came to Canada, because some of them spoke better French than English, I was their liaison with the Champion professional tech reps that were sent from the US to help them. In 1968 when they raced at Le Circuit Mont-Tremblant, I was translating with the teams and recommending fine restaurants and arranging fancy box lunches. I was a 24-year-old kid! What did I know?

The real techs went to dinner with the teams and I took visiting race reps to my favorite restaurants and bars. I introduced them to young women friends and Canadian high-alcohol beer. Because the roads in the Laurentian Mountains are neither straight nor smooth, the ride back in my Champion Spark Plug Co. supplied 318 V8 Plymouth 4-door also introduced them to a new level of anxiety. All vaguely memorable to me now.

But it all worked out and at the end of that F1 weekend at Mont Tremblant, Ferrari’s Team Manager, Mauro Forghieri, gave me a Ferrari pin for my efforts. That was very cool. The next day I went back to putting Champion decals on doors and windows. It was good to be young in the sixties.

This week’s great images were taken by Chuck Schwager who recently co-drove Jim Taylor’s C-Type on this year’s Colorado Grand. Brave soul, he shot several of these from the passenger seat at speed.

Peter Bourassa


New From David Bull Publishing
McLaren From The Inside: Photographs by Tyler Alexander

Posted on July 2, 2013 Comments (0)

McLaren From The Inside: Photographs By Tyler Alexander offers a vivid and uniquely personal perspective on two eras at one of racing’s greatest teams. After joining Bruce McLaren’s new team as a mechanic in 1964, Tyler Alexander played a critical role in creating its earliest cars, which quickly scored wins in Formula 1 and dominated the Can-Am sports-car series. At the same time, Tyler was also recording the team’s progress through hundreds of vivid photographs taken during spare moments at the track and behind the scenes at the McLaren factory.

Tyler Alexander with Timmy Mayer on the grid at Teretonga, New Zealand, during the 1964 Tasman Series.

Tyler Alexander with Timmy Mayer on the grid at Teretonga, New Zealand,
during the 1964 Tasman Series.

Lotus founder Colin Chapman and his wife Hazel during practice for the Monaco Grand Prix in 1964.

Lotus founder Colin Chapman and his wife Hazel during practice for the Monaco Grand Prix in 1964.

Mark Donohue is congratulated for his victory in the 1966 Nassau Trophy race as Roger Penske looks on.

Mark Donohue is congratulated for his victory in the 1966 Nassau Trophy race
as Roger Penske looks on.

Bruce McLaren liked to test a new car without the bodywork in order to get a sense of how it performed without any aerodynamic effects. One result seen here is the M6A’s front tire lifting off the surface at Goodwood.

Bruce McLaren liked to test a new car without the bodywork in order to get a sense of how it performed without any aerodynamic effects. One result seen here is the M6A’s front tire lifting off the surface at Goodwood.

A well-armed Bruce McLaren emerges from a tarpaulin covering the M7 Formula One car during a rainy testing session at Brands Hatch in 1968.

A well-armed Bruce McLaren emerges from a tarpaulin covering the M7 Formula One car during a rainy testing session at Brands Hatch in 1968.

Bruce McLaren on the track at Brands Hatch in early 1968, in Denny Hulme’s M6A Can-Am car. In 1967 Bruce and Denny drove the M6A to victory in five out of six Can-Am races.

Bruce McLaren on the track at Brands Hatch in early 1968, in Denny Hulme’s M6A Can-Am car. In 1967 Bruce and Denny drove the M6A to victory in five out of six Can-Am races.

McLaren team principal Ron Dennis with that “We’ve just won” look on his face after Heikki Kovalainen’s victory at the 2008 Hungarian Grand Prix.

McLaren team principal Ron Dennis with that “We’ve just won” look on his face after Heikki Kovalainen’s victory at the 2008 Hungarian Grand Prix.

Flanked by engineers in the McLaren garage, Jenson Button stares at a monitor showing his results from a practice session at the British Grand Prix at Silverstone in 2010.

Flanked by engineers in the McLaren garage, Jenson Button stares at a monitor showing his results from a practice session at the British Grand Prix at Silverstone in 2010.

McLaren From The Inside collects Tyler’s best photographs from two very different eras. Part I covers the team’s formative years in the 1960s through black-and-white shots of Bruce McLaren and company building, testing, and racing cars in England and around the world. Friends and competitors are also included, among them such great drivers as Jim Clark, Dan Gurney, and Jackie Stewart, as well as team leaders John Cooper, Carroll Shelby, and Colin Chapman. In Part II, Alexander captures the high-tech, hypercompetitive atmosphere of today’s Formula 1 with images taken during the first decade of the 21st century. Along with a new generation of driving talent—Fernando Alonso, Jenson Button, Lewis Hamilton, Kimi Raikkonen—Alexander’s lens also focuses on the designers, engineers, mechanics, and other team members who continue to make McLaren so successful today.

Book Details
McLaren From The Inside: Photographs by Tyler Alexander
By Tyler Alexander
Hardcover, 11” by 11”, 144 pages, 115 black-and-white and 10 color photographs
Retail price: $49.95
ISBN: 978 1 935007 18 0
Available July, 2013

Ordering Information: McLaren From The Inside is available through specialty motoring booksellers and directly from the publisher. Orders can be made by calling 602-852-9500 or by visiting David Bull Publishing. For orders in the United Kingdom please contact Chris Lloyd Sales & Marketing Services, which distributes David Bull Publishing books, at (0) 1202 649930.

Contact Information:
DAVID BULL PUBLISHING

4250 E. Camelback Road, Suite K.150, Phoenix, AZ 85018
Phone: (602) 852-9500 Fax: (602) 852-9503
E-mail: tmoore@bullpublishing.com