MMR Blog

MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on December 24, 2014 Comments (0)

On behalf of all the people who put the MMR Community Newsletter together, Editor Dom Miliano, IT folks Lucy Iannotti and Garret Vreeland, Correctness Advisor Dianne Isaacson, Social Media editor Ashley Novack, our wonderful writers Denise McCluggage and Sandy Cotterman, and all the sponsors who make this possible and who we pray you support, Merry Christmas! For those among us who celebrate Christmas, we hope you have a day filled with good feelings towards family, friends and life. And to everyone else, this may be the only gift you will receive today, but comfort yourself, it is a labor of love and it ain’t shabby.

THE MMR Christmas Letter

Peter Bourassa, at his desk

The other day John Gallagher, good friend and MMR subscriber, sent me a joke about a man who asks the police to find his missing wife. As the police question him about her age, what she looks like and what she is wearing, he exhibits little knowledge. When asked about the car she might be driving, he describes his Corvette in infinite detail. Don’t worry, says the cop, we’ll find your car. Guys find that funny and women, often with good reason, do not.  The MMR Christmas Letter is about a similar person. I will only say that men generally find it funny.

Sandy on Assignment

In this issue we wind up the year with  the Sandy on Assignment review of the recent Winter Park Concours d’Elegance in Florida. Our images this week are all from that event. While Sandy took most of them, we thank longtime MMR subscriber Alex Dearborn and motorsports historian Bill Rothermel for helping us with additional images.

More Good Books

Troy Spencer, MotorBinder, and Harry Hurst, 12 Hours of Sebring

In last week’s issue we recommended some recently released books that would be at ease on your shelves. This week, I want to mention two books, one, Troy Spencer’s MotorBinder is an excellent book about SoCal’s racing scene in the fifties and sixties and the cars which his father owned and sponsored in the day, and Harry Hurst’s book 12 Hours of Sebring 1965 with pictures by Dave Friedman. Both great reads. So take a minute and tell us what great book you read this year and that we may have missed.

A Word about Words

If you are one of those people who is constantly pummeling your friends about the correct pronunciation of words belonging to foreign languages, you might enjoy this week’s short treatise on words.

Michael Furman, Photographer

Michael Furman, 1937 Dubonnet Hispano

Michael’s image this week is a 1937 Dubonnet Hispano from his book Curves of Steel.

Ad Wars

Fiat Environmentally Sexy video still

Nobody can be certain if Fiat or Chrysler will actually survive the next five years. But, and this is coming from a former GM and now Ford guy, if it comes down to who is making the best ads, Chrysler/Fiat wins. If I have to listen to one more deep voice intone the torque stats of a highly polished pickup truck that dominates a scene of scrub land, plaid shirts worn by the same middle-aged women who are waiting for “the right moment” and populate Cialis ads, baby lambs and distant mountains, I will be ill. Serve me information on a clever plate and I am your man. Check out this week’s video.

Help Us Have a Great Holiday

Support our  sponsors, Like us on Facebook and pass this on to a friend. Thanks and have a great holiday.

Peter Bourassa


An Interview with David Hobbs

Posted on September 17, 2014 Comments (0)

By Adrianne Ross, Editor, PCA-NER The Nor’Easter Magazine

David Hobbs

I was so honored to meet David Hobbs. I’ve been a fan for a few years now, and enjoy his commentary on racing and racers.

David was born in June 1939 in Royal Leamington Spa, England. In 1969 he was included in the FIA list of graded drivers—an élite group of 27 drivers who, by their achievements, were rated the best in the world—and he was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 2009. Originally employed as a commentator for the Speed Channel, he currently works as a commentator for NBC and NBC Sports Network.

David Hobbs

David currently lives in Milwaukee with his wife, Margaret. They “putter” around the garden in their spare time, and enjoy winter in Florida. David has two sons, Gregory and Guy. His youngest son, Guy, worked for Speed as a pit reporter on their sports car coverage.

David was kind and patient with me, even though he had been running a bit behind, and had the Hockenheim race the next day. I dragged him into the basement of the Larz Anderson Auto Museum, and what follows is our conversation. I’ve left it largely unedited, so that you can get a sense of the man himself.

AR: Take me from 0 to your first race.

DH: My dad was always into cars, but at the beginning of WWII petrol was heavily rationed. He was from Australia and the English government asked him to stay to develop his transmissions, and help with technical innovations in the automotive business.

I wasn't good at school so I went to Jaguar cars as an apprentice. They had a great system; a great apprenticeship scheme in England. It was a full-scale apprenticeship, where you essentially earned a technical degree.

David Hobbs

While there, I got keen on cars and there was a Jaguar apprentice’s motor club which I joined. I would take my Mum’s car, a Morris Oxford, and would rally cross and the like. But I drove like a mad man on the road and so I decided I should race. Back then it was cheap to get a license. You would join a motor club, any car club, and then pay the entry fees; the whole thing would have been about £15.
It was my Mum’s car with my dad's automatic gearbox. I raced a few times and then I finally won a sprint in it. The following year I convinced my dad to let me race his Jaguar XK140, it also had his gearbox (David’s father designed transmissions and automotive technology). Unfortunately I rolled it in the very first race, and did a little damage. (David smiled broadly at this, indicating that he’d damaged the car quite badly.)

He said I had to fix it, so it didn't get fixed very well. Then he got a big injection of capital from BSA, and we decided that a good form of advertising would be for me to race in a proper car. We bought a Lotus Elite, which I campaigned in 1961 very successfully. Won 14 out of 18 starts at the small tracks, Silverstone, Brands Hatch, the ‘Ring.

AR: Who inspired you?

Sir Stirling Moss

DH: My hero was Sir Stirling Moss. But it wasn't like it is today with videos and TV. You had to go to races, read the papers and magazines to keep up, or follow a driver.

I did go to the very first Grand Prix, the British Grand Prix with my mom and dad, and my brother. But even then it wasn't like a bolt of lightning, you know, it was not what I wanted to do. But I did drive fast on the road. I did like going fast and I was good at it.

AR: What do you drive now?

DH: I don't have any exotic cars, I don't have any car at all, and I never seem to have enough cash to get one (laughing).

AR: And when you're not racing, what does a typical day look like for David Hobbs?

David Hobbs Honda Dealership

DH: I go to the dealership most days, although my son Greg really runs it now. We have quite a few customers who don't believe I really come in every day.

AR: What do you do for fun?

DH: We like to putter around the garden and we have a house in Florida, because I don't like the winter. We go back to England two to three times a year. But not in the summer because it's racing season. I like soccer and tennis. I used to play when I was a kid, until I discovered Motorsport.

AR: You’ve had 20 Le Mans starts, what are the best and worst parts of that race?

DH: The worst is the rain, and night can be tricky. It's a long circuit, eight miles. It's not like Daytona, when you're there for hours running around a fishbowl. In my day, there weren't all those chicanes, which is very hard on the car, and hard on the drivers. In my day we did the race with just two drivers. Now they use three or sometimes four.

AR: …about [your] grandson, and his working his way into a racing career…

DH: It's so expensive to start racing unless you find a fairy godfather. Four or five of the F1 drivers pay to be there. In my day there was a lot of stepping into a dead man’s shoes. That seems grizzly, but it was really how it worked.

But I've never raced anywhere when I didn't get paid for it. Even NASCAR.

AR: How was NASCAR?

DH: It's harder than it looks. Massively talented drivers come into NASCAR and they can't do it. Juan Pablo was a good example of that.

AR: What do you think of Senna, and RUSH (the movies)?

DH: I thought Senna was very good. Well put together. To be a world champion you have to be selfish, and greedy, and solely, solely concerned with yourself. He was the epitome of that for sure. RUSH was a good story of human conflict. But the drama and partying was a bit overblown. Grand Prix and Le Mans are my favorites. They did a great job considering the time and standards.

AR: Who's the funniest person in F1 ever?

DH: I wouldn't say anyone in F1 is really funny; it’s not a funny place, the paddock of Formula 1. Everyone is just focused on the race and the cars but Graham Hill was an amazing storyteller. Very good at making jokes at other peoples expense but not good when the shoe was on the other foot. Jackie and Jimmy Clark were not particularly jokey guys. The guy that's really pretty funny, and probably pretty good fun to be with is Daniel Ricciardo. He likes to sort of dance in front of his mechanics.

AR: What’s your favorite track?

DH: The ‘Ring, the Glen, Road America, Phillipston; I've never found a track I don't like, really.

DAvid Hobbs at Indy


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on April 25, 2014 Comments (0)

An Apology

Constant Contact is our MMR Newsletter distributor. Last Friday, a power outage affected their ability to supply images for our newsletter for over six hours. We apologize to our subscribers for this inconvenience.

F1 China

It has become clear that the new F1 cars come pre-sorted with a set of characteristics that cannot be tuned out. Drivers have to adapt to them or perish. The drivers for the Mercedes team seem quite equal in talent and also seem to have adapted to the car’s idiosyncrasies equally. That doesn’t mean that another driver might not do better, but we would never know until one tries. The Red Bull Team on the other hand is a different situation. Sebastian Vettel was the master of the previous chassis and his then teammate Mark Webber never got it to the same extent. But Vettel definitely hasn’t come to terms with the new chassis. The problem for him is that his new Red Bull teammate, Daniel Ricciardo, has. To the team, this means that the issues to be overcome are not so much the car, though it does need improvement, it is helping their #1 driver adapt to it. And to his credit, Vettel admits he is the problem. If he can resolve this problem he will come out of this not just a better driver but a different person.

Our lead image this week is from Denise McCluggage's column. Her story this week compares today’s cars with a time when a racing driver’s input was necessary to maximize the car's potential. You can also visit her website where you can see more Denise McCluggage images for sale. The remainder of the eye-candy on this page is from this year's Amelia Concours event. Enjoy!

Blue Highways

America is blessed with some wonderful and sometimes little used back roads. As more and better freeways are built for our transportation needs, these blue highways, as they are defined on most maps, are becoming the purview of car enthusiasts exercising cars that were probably built in the same time period. In Europe, the historic Mille Miglia is a huge affair for both spectators and participants and in America the Colorado Grand, the New England 1000 and the Copperstate are rallies giving drivers an opportunity to celebrate and exercise their vintage vehicles in the company of like minded individuals in beautiful settings. In the coming weeks we will have a report on the Mille Miglia from participant and MMR Newsletter subscriber Bruce Male. We will further explore this expanding form of motorsports entertainment and whether it can fit in your plans. So stay tuned.

At the Track and on TV

The Mitty (as in Walter Mitty) is fast establishing itself as the premier event of the vintage racing scene in America and it is this weekend at Road Atlanta. While not quite ready for prime time TV yet, if you are in that area, make the time to refresh your memories of great cars of our past. On the more contemporary front, IndyCar is at Barber Motorsports Park in Alabama this weekend. This is the first race of this year on a proper road racing circuit and it will be interesting.

Have a great weekend and don’t forget to share this with a friend.

Peter Bourassa


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on April 18, 2014 Comments (0)

Amelia Island 2014

100 years of Maserati was celebrated at Amelia this year and we captured this image of the unique 450S Coupe as it was moving to take its place on the field. 

Our eye candy this week is taken from the MMR Classifieds. Our goal with the MMR Classifieds is to save you the trouble of sifting through thousands of images of vehicles. We will list 400 cars that are of interest to us. The sampling below should give you some idea of what to expect. 

Next week we begin our series on modern day rally-touring. The Michael Furman image was taken from his gallery on our site.

Horch 853 Cabriolet

Horch 853 Cabriolet

Around the Track

Sometime in the 1960s, a Canadian bass-baritone was singing the role of bad-guy Scarpia in Tosca at L’Opera in Paris. It was one of those nights when two other leads, the good guys, were just slightly off. He was fine. At the end of the second act Tosca stabs Scarpia and he falls to the floor. In the moment of silence allowed for the audience to appreciate the drama of the scene, a voice from the audience was clearly heard to say “Quel domage, ils ont tue le meilleur.” What a shame, they killed the best one.

We were prescient; a head did roll. The noble Domenicalli, Director of Ferrari Racing, has accepted full responsibility for Ferrari’s poor performance and resigned. Quel Domage. Stefano, who appeared to be a warm and funny man, was certainly a refreshing change from the sphinx-like Jean Todt. For that matter, Sir Frank and Sir Ron could hardly be described as cheerful. The former Mercedes duo of Ross Brawn and Norbert Haug never threatened Laurel and Hardy either. Must come with the territory.

Aston Martin DB 2 MK III

Aston Martin DB 2 MK III

Penske vs. Ganassi Battle on Track and Off

It was inevitable. Two great teams go head to head in multiple series for years and sooner or later one is going to say something nasty about the other. Surprisingly, the first public utterances come from the polished Penske team. Before the Long Beach IndyCar weekend, which neither team won, Autoweek reports that Tim Cindric, President of Penske Racing, “tried a baseball analogy, making those in Ganassi colors see red. He said Team Penske is the New York Yankees and Ganassi Racing the Miami Marlins.” Ganassi responded that “from time to time Tim probably cashes lots of different checks in different currency that Roger doesn’t like cashing.” The sphinx-like Roger said not a word. Comes with the territory.

Allard K1-544 Sport

Allard K1-544 Sport

Long Beach Weekend

Saturday: The Tudor Sports Car Series race was the main event and even though the classes are still confusing, the racing was great. The final laps were flat-out racing in both the prototype and the GTLM production car classes. Ford Eco-Boost powered Riley with Scott Pruett and Memo Rojas won for Ganassi in Prototype. In the GT Le Mans class Corvette won overall but the battle for second between another Corvette, the BMW, and the Viper was tremendous. It is amazing and a testament to the excellent work that IMSA has done to make cars as disparate as these so competitive with each other.

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Torpedo de Lux

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Torpedo de Lux

Sunday: The IndyCar feature race of the weekend was “wild”. Many harsh words exchanged but no fisticuffs and cars did collide; people who know better made dumb moves. And, while everyone talks about Ganassi and Penske teams as the powerhouses, it was the Andretti car driven by Ryan Hunter-Reay that led 51 laps and was followed by a second Andretti car driven by James Hinchcliff. Unfortunately they took each other out. Unkind words were spoken. So none of the big teams won. As for the race, it was excellent! Like most street tracks, Long Beach has issues but the pluses outweigh the shortcomings. The fact that the field is so deep, talented, and competitive makes for great racing. Amazingly, running a single car doesn’t appear to be a disadvantage. Single car teams made up the front row. Ed Carpenter Racing and driver Mike Conway won the race. It was fun to watch. The fuel and tire strategies, the quick young drivers and experienced veterans, a tight course with no run-offs, are the ingredients required for laughter and tears and there was plenty of the latter. If you are looking for an exciting change from F1, give this a try.

And, BTW, pass this on to a friend.

Peter Bourassa

1938 MG TA Tickford

1938 MG TA Tickford

 1932 Delage D8 SS Interior | Michael Furman, Photographer

1932 Delage D8 SS Interior | Michael Furman, Photographer


Finding Eye Candy in NYC

Posted on December 4, 2013 Comments (0)

Major metropolitan cities are not conducive to showing off fancy cars. In 1987 I remember asking a NYC cab driver to drop me at an address near where I had left my brand new red Corvette convertible parked on the street. As we drove by my car, the cabbie pointed to it and said, I guess he don’t like that car anymore. I smiled. On a recent trip to NYC, we had a nice and unanticipated motorsports experience walking by Bergdorf-Goodman on Fifth Avenue. We share it.

Bergdorf Goodman

Model T51 Racing Wheel

Window Sign Lot 32 Ettore Bugatti Racing Wheel