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MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on November 22, 2013 Comments (0)

This week’s images are from Michael Furman’s excellent new book Automotive JewelryRead our review.

Fixing F1 – Step Three - Bring Back Risk

Let’s face it, the risks in today’s F1 races are hardly commensurate with the rewards. The danger and often deadly aspects of older tracks, long gone road courses, and races such as the Mille Miglia and the Targa Florio were inherent and impossible to eliminate. Huge trees, narrow roads and stone bridges, were all part of the perils of racing and everyone, drivers and spectators, recognized them. For drivers, the risks were always high and the monetary rewards comparatively low.

However, other than being a fighter pilot during war, there are few opportunities to compete with like individuals at a potentially lethal level and earn both adulation and great sums of money for doing it.

Keeping It on the Island

Keeping it on the island.

Today, what commentators call a brave move is more likely to be an unanticipated maneuver. The risk is now limited to a damaged car and/or loss of championship points. Is it admirable? Unquestionably. Is it brave? Not the way it once was. Is it exciting? Well that’s the question isn’t it? Lawyers and insurance companies have successfully eliminated risk from but a few corners at a few tracks. And if we are not pleased that racing is now safe, what does it say about us? Are we the new old Romans?

F1 – US GP

A boring race. See above. There was an opportunity for drama. Lotus borrowed former F1 driver and now Caterham test driver Heikki Kovalainen to replace the Never Leave ‘em Laughin’ Kimi. The Kimster had back surgery so that he could be healed in time to race for Ferrari next year. True to form, Kovalainen, once again, didn’t fail to disappoint. Surprisingly quick in practice, only 8th in qualifying, he finished 14th. There is a reason this driver has a test contract with the worst team on the grid. To his credit, he doesn’t blame the machinery.

Snooze Fest

Snooze Fest in Texas

So now on to Brazil and more of the same.

NASCAR – Johnson Wins Again

The 2103 NASCAR marathon is over. A talented driver, who works hard, has a great pit crew and races clean, Jimmy Johnson won the championship. I gave up watching when the challenge became the re-engineering of the tire pressures and suspension setups through their far-too-long oval Sunday afternoon marathons. Like other forms of high level racing, the battle now is among the engineers. The saving grace for NASCAR may be its road races. NASCAR drivers are not recognized for just how good they are. If NASCAR dropped Sears Point, added Laguna Seca, Lime Rock, Road America, and Road Atlanta and two more tight tracks, they would have an exciting new series.  

Nascar

Welcome NASCAR Fans?


Denise McCluggage

Denise McCluggage: The Centered Driver Workshop

Mark your Calendars. January 28, 2014. Denise will hold an interactive drivers workshop at European Motorsports in Lawrence MA. The class is for a maximum of 60 participants. Order your tickets here.


Burt Levy

Our Buddy Burt – Holiday Offerings

Vintage Racer and Author, Burt Levy, has forwarded his Holiday gift suggestions and a teaser about delivering his second Ford/Ferrari/Le Mans book entitled Assault on Four O’clock. Check out the pricing on Holiday cards on Burt's website.

Have a great weekend.

Peter Bourassa


Father's Day Gifts You Deserve!

Posted on June 16, 2011 Comments (0)

In a calendar year, there are far too few opportunities for the displays of affection which many MMR Community enthusiasts so richly deserve.

Christmas, our Birthday and Father's Day are it!

The MMR Resource Directory specializes in finding only the best products for our community. The following are links to our favorite categories in the MMR Resource Directory, and we've made it easy for you by choosing a resource from each category that features special and unique gifts that we would all like to receive. 

Let MMR help your loved ones better appreciate just how special you are! And, just in case they don't really get it, pick something out for yourself.

Remember this month's MMR motto: We deserve great gifts!

All kidding aside, Father's Day can be the best day of the year and we at MMR Community Headquarters wish you a great one.

Please don't forget to support all the wonderful suppliers who support our Community. They are what makes MMR possible.

Happy Father's Day!


The Korean GP 2010 Settles Nothing

Posted on November 1, 2010 Comments (0)

I’ve waited up half the night for a lot of exciting things in my life. The Korean Grand Prix doesn’t qualify as one of them.

Red Bull's Korean Nightmare

Red Bull’s Korean GP debut was not pretty.

In a 16 race F1 schedule you can generally count on 75% of them being boring. The others are usually interesting either because they occur at the end of the year with a championship at stake, or it rains. Korea promised both. Instead it delivered a boring race in the rain and made us wait up for it. 

Alonso won by employing that clever old strategy of staying in front and not doing anything exciting. Webber and Vettel lost by being in front and being unlucky. In Webber's case he made a dumb mistake and was also unlucky enough to be caught out by it.

The really unlucky one was Nico Rosberg who was driving brilliantly until he was collected by the dumb/unlucky Webber who ended Rosberg’s bid for a podium and another trouncing of the once fabulous and now just plain old Schumi. Michael was jubilant with his finish and no one had the heart to point out that three guys in front of him had to crash for him to finish fourth.

In business or life, everyone needs a reserve of sympathy, understanding or forgiveness that gets one through a tough time. Supplying it is what friends are for. It’s what engenders a “second chance”. Webber may have eliminated himself from the championship and if he did and somehow there isn’t a great deal of that sympathy left in the tank for him. Odd, because he came into this race with the support of many but left it with much of that gone. At his level of pay and expectation, a self induced mistake at this point is really not forgivable.

If one of the Red Bull drivers or the team wins a championship, it will be despite their best efforts to throw it away. And if Alonso and/or Ferrari win, it will be because they never gave up. They took a “third best car on the grid” and kept making it better and they made less crucial mistakes. Ferrari Team Manager, Stefano Domenicali understands the sympathetic reserve and this season he has managed to put Ferrari in a position that the Todt-Braun-Schumacher team could never do. Through his thoughtful handling of interviews, he has mollified the ”anything-but-Ferrari” fans. Amazing what a little humility and grace can accomplish.

For raw talent there is not much to choose between the top six drivers and Rosberg. Experience and judgment are the determining factors and it is tough to take anything away from Alonso in either department. He is quick and he makes few mistakes and while that may win him a championship, it isn’t worth staying up half the night to see.


Turkish Grand Prix: Sunday Morning in Turkey

Posted on June 7, 2010 Comments (1)

Sunday, I was watching a parade and a F1 race broke out.

Turkishf1

F1 Grand Prix of Istanbul - Race

ISTANBUL, TURKEY - MAY 30:  Mark Webber of Australia and Red Bull Racing leads from Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain and McLaren Mercedes at the start of the Turkish Formula One Grand Prix at Istanbul Park on May 30, 2010, in Istanbul, Turkey.  (Photo by Malcolm Griffiths/Getty Images)

On Sunday morning and Sunday afternoon two very different races, one in Turkey and the other in Indianapolis, left many questions unanswered.

The F1 race in Turkey was run for the benefit of only four cars. McLaren and Red Bull teams ran away from everyone else. As usual, qualifying well was the advantage that was needed to lead the first lap and the Red Bull cars, while not as quick as the McLarens in a straight line, had a distinct advantage in the twisty bits.

So Mark Webber who sat on pole, got away cleanly, his partner, Sebastian Vettel , slotted into second when Lewis Hamilton was held unexpectedly in the pits on lap 15 and it looked very much like a one-two for Red Bull and a three- four for McLaren.

redbullwaving

ISTANBUL, TURKEY - MAY 30:  Sebastian Vettel of Germany and Red Bull Racing reacts as he crashes out after colliding with his team mate Mark Webber of Australia and Red Bull Racing during the Turkish Formula One Grand Prix at Istanbul Park on May 30, 2010, in Istanbul, Turkey.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

At that point the cars were too evenly matched to expect a change and no passing had taken place among them on the track. But there were still technical unpredictables. The possibility of tires “going off” or “graining” and the ultimate F1 equalizer, rain, loomed.

Neither happened.

However, the human unpredictable did. The irrepressible Vettel in second place, due to different car set-up and team tactics, at one point had a slightly quicker car than his teammate, the repressible Mark Webber. On lap 40 of a 58 lap race he attempted to pass in a tight spot. In the process they both went off the track, the McLarens passed, Vettel was out and Webber finished third. It might have been stupid, but it was unexpected and entertaining.

Sebastian

ISTANBUL, TURKEY - MAY 30:  Sebastian Vettel of Germany and Red Bull Racing reacts as he crashes out after colliding with his team mate Mark Webber of Australia and Red Bull Racing during the Turkish Formula One Grand Prix at Istanbul Park on May 30, 2010, in Istanbul, Turkey.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

So now the McLarens were one-two with Hamilton in the lead when “vettelism” seized Jenson Button, the now in second place McLaren driver. He decided, on lap 48, to pass his teammate and race leader Lewis Hamilton. Well, that lasted for about five corners and then, once they had banged into each other, they were told by their pits they could have a fuel problem, so they should settle down to a parade formation to the finish.

“Conserve fuel! We have calculated that you are running out.” is code for “If you stupid bastards don’t cut this out we are going to trade you both for Kimi and you can learn to drive Renaults around elephant dung for the next ten years.”

The fact that these four guys actually raced each other was quite novel and great fun to watch. What it also gave us was a glimpse of what racing could be like without team orders. And while we are dreaming, suppose the whole track could be used instead of half of it being covered in rubber “marbles"?

And then TV witnessed the cleverness of the Red Bull engineers and managers when confronted with a management and PR situation. This is leadership! Vettel comes by the pits while the race is still on and they all hug him.

Turkishending

ISTANBUL, TURKEY - MAY 30:  Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain and McLaren Mercedes leads from team mate Jenson Button of Great Britain and McLaren Mercedes on his way to winning the Turkish Formula One Grand Prix at Istanbul Park on May 30, 2010, in Istanbul, Turkey.  (Photo by Vladimir Rys/Bongarts/Getty Images)

The poor little boy, he broke his toy.

If that was my car that he had damned near destroyed trying to pass his teammate who was the pole sitter and leading the race, I would have grabbed him by his cute little ear and marched him straight down to the Lotus pit and told him to help them win a championship for the next few years.

And I would have had a word with Webber about doing something stupid like not moving over when my teammate does something stupid like trying to pass me in a tight spot that could have taken both cars out.

That’s a management point of view.

From a fan’s point of view it was unpredictably refreshing and I’ll bet we never see that again from these four.

So what did you think of the show?

pb