MMR Blog

Le Mans 1971

Posted on May 29, 2014 Comments (1)

by Michael Keyser

Here are a few more [photographs of the Daytona]. One is just after the race with people crawling on the car. Not sure if you know the story, but the car was driven by Luigi Chinetti, Jr. and Bob Grossman. They finished 5th and thought they’d won the GT class … until the French did some slight of hand. Somehow, the ACO decided the Ferrari wasn’t a GT car and awarded the class win to the 911S that finished 6th and was driven by … guess … two Frenchmen.

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser

Le Mans 1971 - Photo by Michael Keyser


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on May 23, 2014 Comments (0)

Reading Ferrari Concours d’Elegance

Indianapolis 500

Memorial Day weekend is traditionally the first big motorsports weekend of the season. On this side of the pond, the Month of May Marathon known as Indianapolis 500 dominates the news and the Charlotte 600 will occupy NASCAR fans who can stay awake that long. Something to look for at Indy: All the race cars have identical Dallara chassis. The differences are the drivers and the engines. The engines are by Honda and Chevy and each has five cars in the top ten starting spots. As in multiple pit stop races, this one will come down to which engine and driver combo gets the best mileage and makes the fewest, shortest stops. It should be a great race.

F1: GP of Monaco

AMG Mercedes F1

On the very same day, F1 celebrates its crown jewel, the Grand Prix de Monaco . Tickets are still available for Saturday and Sunday at just over $1K US per seat. Paddock Club Seats, with free refreshments, are $6.3K US each. Perhaps they call it the Crown Jewel of F1 because you almost have to hock yours to get a seat. If all goes to form, the winner may actually be chosen on Saturday at the end of qualifying. If you recall last year’s winner, Nico Rosberg, led from pole with a slow car that no one could pass. That is the nature of this track and that’s why this is the most important qualifying session of the season. Don’t miss it.

Monaco Video

This week’s video is a fascinating side-by-side look at Michael Schumacher’s lap of Monaco to win the F1 GP pole in 2012 and Nico Rosberg's 2013 Monaco pole. It is really quite remarkable just how devoid of imagination one needs to be to drive an F1 car there.

Monaco Books

Speaking of Monaco, check out David Bull Publishing who have a special offer on their signed copies of Hunt vs. Lauda and Chris Amon’s book A Year of Living Dangerously. The latter is reviewed in our Racemaker Press Book Reviews.

The Lotus-Etc I Left Behind

Denise McCluggage’s story about rallying a Ford Cortina in the sixties is the kind of adventure that just couldn’t happen today. Dammit.

In Praise of Older Cars, Part 2

Those of you who loved the ‘60s and ‘70s will enjoy it. Those of you who missed them will yawn or think me daft. Or both. We welcome your thoughts.

Passings

Sir Jack

An apt title for this paragraph as the death of Australian Sir Jack Brabham, three time F1 Champion, engineer, and car constructor reminds us of a winning driver who was hard to pass and difficult to keep passed. Putting aside stories of his driving style, Brabham’s accomplishments are not inconsiderable. He introduced rear engine cars to the Indianapolis 500 with Cooper in 1961. He is the only person to ever win an F1 World Championship with a car of his own construction. In 1966, he saw the potential of the Buick 215 CID aluminum engine which, with Australian parts company Repco’s help, he turned into a championship winning Repco V8 engine. He is survived by sons Geoff, Gary, and David. All successful racers.

Reading Concours. Pietro Castiglioni

Last weekend, Editor Dom Miliano attended the Reading Ferrari Concours d’Elegance where he shot this week’s eye candy. The event celebrated the life and Ferrari times of its founder Pietro Castiglioni. He is featured in this painting.

The Furman Image

Michael Furman photography. Side view of a Bugatti Type 35

This week’s Michael Furman image is a side view of a Bugatti Type 35.

Have a great weekend.

Peter Bourassa

Reading Ferrari Concours d’Elegance

Reading Ferrari Concours d’Elegance


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on May 9, 2014 Comments (0)

Tweaking Makes the Difference

Anyone who switched on the Tudor Sports Car Racing Series mid race last weekend must have thought they were in a time warp. Tremendous racing! The race was at Laguna Seca which is a great track with all kinds of turn radii and elevation changes, and a perpetually slippery surface. Perfect. The biggest difficultly in putting the two series together was insuring that there would be competitive racing for each class in both series. The most difficult to satisfy would be the Prototypes. The American Le Mans and Daytona Prototypes are simply very different beasts. The first races were not real road race courses. Daytona with its huge banking and Mickey Mouse infield section, Sebring, the forlorn airfield that has for decades seen historic races but little resurfacing, and Long Beach, one of the more interesting street circuits but none-the-less bumpy, have all favored the Daytona Prototypes and this was expected.

At the first real race course, the ALMS Prototypes came into their own. Thanks to minor rule tweaks and a format that split the field because the pit area couldn’t accommodate all the entrants, they made it a fight and eventually beat the DP cars to win. It worked! Huge sighs all around and great for them and great for American road racing!

The sports car racing was spectacular and it was fun watching Bill Auberlen drive through the pack in his BMW to catch, bump, and pass the factory Porsche to finish second behind the Corvette of Magnussen/Garcia. Want to catch up? Check out Mr. Energy Justin Bell’s pre-race program and year-to-date summary. Instructive and entertaining. 

Alfa Addendum

Last week we wrote (cynically) about how Fiat was setting Alfa Romeo up as a stand-alone company. We further assumed that the move was made to position the company to be sold. Yesterday Fiat announced that it will spend $7 Billion dollars to produce eight new models that will be designed and built in Italy and on the market in 2018. After years of feeling like Charlie Brown, we don’t want to believe that Sergio Marchionne and Fiat will pull the football away again. And once again we will live in hope. And wait. Again.

Toyota to Texas

Last week Toyota announced they would be moving their US headquarters to Texas from California. This week Denise McCluggage writes about pickup trucks in general and Toyota pickup trucks in particular and “Texas”. Enjoy.

Michael Furman News

Michael Furman's photograph of a 1927 Bugatti 35C and is from his book The Art of Bugatti – Mullin Automotive Museum

This week’s image is of a 1927 Bugatti 35C and is from his book The Art of BugattiMullin Automotive Museum. You can learn how he does his magic this Saturday. Michael is doing a photography demo at the Trenton-Mercer Airport in Trenton, NJ, from 9:30AM to 2:30PM. Learn more at the MMR Calendar.

F1 from Spain this weekend. Have a great one.

Peter Bourassa


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on May 2, 2014 Comments (0)

Alfas

Alfa: A Glorious Past—An Unpredictable Future

Regular subscribers may have noticed that mention of Alfa Romeo occurs frequently in our weekly screeds. The history of this glorious brand provides excellent fodder for our constant railings against the plastic look-alike offerings of Maserati, Jaguar and Buick.

Alfa Romeo has had two lives; a full rich one in Europe where its successful racing and fine street cars engendered a passion which endures around the world today. And another in America where its European accomplishments were generally unknown but where Alfa race cars soared sporadically in the sixties and seventies. Truth be told, it is best remembered in America for being Dustin Hoffmann’s ride in The Graduate.

Alfa

This week it was announced that Fiat would be removing Alfa from under the Ferrari–Maserati umbrella and making it a stand-alone company. In fact, Ferrari is the premium performance brand, and a struggling Maserati is not a close second. Porsche has that. Glorious as its past unquestionably is, today there is no room for Alfa Romeo in the Fiat garage. This week’s announcement is not accompanied by a hopeful plan or an encouraging narrative. Rather it has fueled speculation that Alfa Romeo is being positioned for sale. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if it found a loving home.

Alfa 3 wheel

Alfa: History Flash

In keeping with the Alfa theme, contributor S. Scott Callan has provided us a reminder of Alfa’s glorious past from his book, Alfa Romeo: View from The Mouth of the Dragon.

Ferrari 250 GTO in Motion

Ferrari 250 GTO 1964

University of Rhode Island Film Professor, one time actor, and MMR subscriber Hal Hamilton forwarded a great video of Derek Hill narrating the history of and driving the Ferrari 250 GTO that his father drove to victory in several major races. This is about as close as many of us will ever get to the view from the passenger seat of this most beautiful of the 36 GTOs ever made.

Senna and RUSH

Motorsports magazines are reminding Ayrton Senna fans that this month marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Ayrton Senna at Imola. Autoweek carried Alain Prost’s fairly brief remembrance of their relationship in the most recent issue. As it happens, I saw RUSH last week and read the Prost piece shortly afterward. It occurred to me that the rivalry between Senna and Prost would have made a far better film.

Images

Our lead image and Alfa images this week are from Michael Keyser’s excellent book Racing Demons – Porsche and the Targa Florio.

And Michael Furman’s image this week is a great shot of the long tail 917 that lives at the Simeone in Philadelphia. Isn’t it stunning?

photo by Michael Furman, Porsche Long Tail 917

If you haven’t visited our Uncommon Classifieds recently, click here. There are a number of rare and interesting cars on offer at this time. Take a moment to dream, it’s good for you.

Have a great weekend and please share this with a friend.

Peter Bourassa


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on April 18, 2014 Comments (0)

Amelia Island 2014

100 years of Maserati was celebrated at Amelia this year and we captured this image of the unique 450S Coupe as it was moving to take its place on the field. 

Our eye candy this week is taken from the MMR Classifieds. Our goal with the MMR Classifieds is to save you the trouble of sifting through thousands of images of vehicles. We will list 400 cars that are of interest to us. The sampling below should give you some idea of what to expect. 

Next week we begin our series on modern day rally-touring. The Michael Furman image was taken from his gallery on our site.

Horch 853 Cabriolet

Horch 853 Cabriolet

Around the Track

Sometime in the 1960s, a Canadian bass-baritone was singing the role of bad-guy Scarpia in Tosca at L’Opera in Paris. It was one of those nights when two other leads, the good guys, were just slightly off. He was fine. At the end of the second act Tosca stabs Scarpia and he falls to the floor. In the moment of silence allowed for the audience to appreciate the drama of the scene, a voice from the audience was clearly heard to say “Quel domage, ils ont tue le meilleur.” What a shame, they killed the best one.

We were prescient; a head did roll. The noble Domenicalli, Director of Ferrari Racing, has accepted full responsibility for Ferrari’s poor performance and resigned. Quel Domage. Stefano, who appeared to be a warm and funny man, was certainly a refreshing change from the sphinx-like Jean Todt. For that matter, Sir Frank and Sir Ron could hardly be described as cheerful. The former Mercedes duo of Ross Brawn and Norbert Haug never threatened Laurel and Hardy either. Must come with the territory.

Aston Martin DB 2 MK III

Aston Martin DB 2 MK III

Penske vs. Ganassi Battle on Track and Off

It was inevitable. Two great teams go head to head in multiple series for years and sooner or later one is going to say something nasty about the other. Surprisingly, the first public utterances come from the polished Penske team. Before the Long Beach IndyCar weekend, which neither team won, Autoweek reports that Tim Cindric, President of Penske Racing, “tried a baseball analogy, making those in Ganassi colors see red. He said Team Penske is the New York Yankees and Ganassi Racing the Miami Marlins.” Ganassi responded that “from time to time Tim probably cashes lots of different checks in different currency that Roger doesn’t like cashing.” The sphinx-like Roger said not a word. Comes with the territory.

Allard K1-544 Sport

Allard K1-544 Sport

Long Beach Weekend

Saturday: The Tudor Sports Car Series race was the main event and even though the classes are still confusing, the racing was great. The final laps were flat-out racing in both the prototype and the GTLM production car classes. Ford Eco-Boost powered Riley with Scott Pruett and Memo Rojas won for Ganassi in Prototype. In the GT Le Mans class Corvette won overall but the battle for second between another Corvette, the BMW, and the Viper was tremendous. It is amazing and a testament to the excellent work that IMSA has done to make cars as disparate as these so competitive with each other.

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Torpedo de Lux

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Torpedo de Lux

Sunday: The IndyCar feature race of the weekend was “wild”. Many harsh words exchanged but no fisticuffs and cars did collide; people who know better made dumb moves. And, while everyone talks about Ganassi and Penske teams as the powerhouses, it was the Andretti car driven by Ryan Hunter-Reay that led 51 laps and was followed by a second Andretti car driven by James Hinchcliff. Unfortunately they took each other out. Unkind words were spoken. So none of the big teams won. As for the race, it was excellent! Like most street tracks, Long Beach has issues but the pluses outweigh the shortcomings. The fact that the field is so deep, talented, and competitive makes for great racing. Amazingly, running a single car doesn’t appear to be a disadvantage. Single car teams made up the front row. Ed Carpenter Racing and driver Mike Conway won the race. It was fun to watch. The fuel and tire strategies, the quick young drivers and experienced veterans, a tight course with no run-offs, are the ingredients required for laughter and tears and there was plenty of the latter. If you are looking for an exciting change from F1, give this a try.

And, BTW, pass this on to a friend.

Peter Bourassa

1938 MG TA Tickford

1938 MG TA Tickford

 1932 Delage D8 SS Interior | Michael Furman, Photographer

1932 Delage D8 SS Interior | Michael Furman, Photographer