MMR Blog

MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on November 29, 2014 Comments (4)

The entire MMR team, Dom, Lucy, Ashley, Dianne, Sandy, Denise, and I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving Day yesterday and welcome you to Black Friday. MMR is but words and pictures and we work hard to bring you the best of both. Our Black Friday edition reflects this as we present a number of interesting classified cars and some new books we know you will want in your collection! Buy Something!

The 2014 F1 Season Ends with a Whimper

Nico Rosberg’s race and season ended when the red lights went out. His otherwise moderately reliable Mercedes had an issue with its electronic launch control system. Do you remember when launch control was a left foot and a pedal? It is somehow fitting that a race series that generates so much money and is discussing how that money could be more equally shared should end in Abu Dhabi at a marina in a desert country where the best seats are on multi-million dollar yachts. No disconnect here. The best car won. It was the combination of two excellent drivers with different strengths. The constant reliability concerns supplied the tension and entertainment for the season.

The following is our 2015 winners & losers list.

Sam Posey

#1 Winner: NBCSN

Thanks for making the Fox “bargain basement” coverage a thing of the past. Pre and Post race programs are appreciated. Thanks especially for keeping Sam Posey in the transition. His insights do make a difference. A class act all around.


Williams Racing

#2 Winner: Williams Racing

Not the most money but they kicked ass. Thank You Martini for believing. Next time we are shopping we will buy a bottle of your product.


Massa and Bottas

#3 Winners: Bottas...

Finished fourth in the Championship. Fast, a good racer, self-deprecating, and a future World Champion. 

and Massa

Kicked out by Ferrari, did better than Raikkonen by far.


Vettel and Ricciardo

#1 Loser: Vettel

Four times World Champion and wonder boy, to a distant second to Ricciardo, and now on to Ferrari.


Ferrari off-track

#2 Loser: Ferrari

No engine, chassis, or aero package. Moving forward with new management and the possibility of uncertain funding.


McLaren F1

#3 Loser: McLaren

Under new management they had the same engine as Mercedes and Williams and did nothing about their chassis. Next year they have a new Honda engine. And Alonso?


Alonso

Who were your winners and losers? Tell us in the comments below.

Have a great weekend and please remember to encourage friends to subscribe.

Peter Bourassa


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on November 14, 2014 Comments (1)

Art Direction and Photography by Royce Rumsey, Auto-Focused copyright 2014 All Rights Reserved. Arizona Concours d'Elegance.

Arizona Concours d'Elegance. Photography by Royce Rumsey, Auto-Focused © 2014.


Racing: Chess & Crisis in Brazil & Phoenix

F1

Kimi and Fernando

Chess

“Brazil was an interesting race”, that was Ferrari driver Fernando Alonzo’s take on the Brazil GP. And for him it was. For the remainder of us, other than the scrap Fernando had with his teammate, Kimi Raikkonen there was little to watch. This was a cerebral race. Like chess, the battle went on in the minds of Rosberg and Hamilton and Hamilton was the only one with something to lose. The highly touted Abu Dhabi will be no different. Another no-conflict second will bring him the Championship.

German stands

Crisis

F1 has two issues but both boil down to the same thing. Money. The cost of running a team in F1 is too high for but a few and they are becoming fewer. Initially supported by race car manufacturers and wealthy businessmen and sportsmen, the advent of tobacco money and big advertising, changed all that. Today there remain two self-funding car company teams, one is rich and the other is struggling. The remainder of the teams are dependent on outside sponsorship to survive. That brings us to the second issue. The price of staging a race is prohibitive and the organizers make money primarily on ticket sales. It is judged that attendance was down 50% in Brazil last weekend, the numbers for Russia were not available, and these are not the only places where the gate is down. All is not well in paradise. Incidentally this isn’t the only series where attendance is down.


Art Direction and Photography by Royce Rumsey, Auto-Focused copyright 2014 All Rights Reserved. Arizona Concours d'Elegance.

Arizona Concours d'Elegance. Photography by Royce Rumsey, Auto-Focused © 2014.


NASCAR

nascar chase grid final 2014

No fisticuffs this week but a war of quotes and the series winds down to its finale at Homestead, a typically dismal Florida track of cinderblock and former ocean bottom. The Chase has been whittled down to four potential winners. The irony is that none has to win the championship by winning the race. They simply must finish ahead of the other three. And one of them, Ryan Newman, hasn’t won a race this year. He got into the “final four” by intentionally pushing a competitor out of the way last weekend, something even he abhorred and for which he semi-apologized. This would all make for a hollow Championship indeed.

The racing season is in its dying moments. For those of us looking forward to the next one, January 11th in Scottsdale looks good. It may be hell in the summer, but it is definitely heaven in January.


Royce Rumsey photography, copyright 2014

Arizona Concours d'Elegance. Photography by Royce Rumsey, Auto-Focused © 2014.

Our Resource Directory feature this week is the Arizona Concours d’Elegance at The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix. The images are by Royce Rumsey of Auto-Focus and were taken at the Concours last year. They are a clue to the quality and diversity you can expect to see in January.


This week’s Michael Furman image is from his book Curves of Steel.

This week’s Michael Furman image is from his book Curves of Steel.


Please share this MMR Community Newsletter with a friend. See you all here next week.

Peter Bourassa

Art Direction and Photography by Royce Rumsey, Auto-Focused copyright 2014 All Rights Reserved. Arizona Concours d'Elegance.

Arizona Concours d'Elegance. Photography by Royce Rumsey, Auto-Focused © 2014.


MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on November 8, 2013 Comments (0)

Fixing F1 – Step 1

It has always amazed that the F1 circus would travel half way round the world to perform before crowds that know little and care even less about F1. France, home of several fine circuits, great automakers, the world’s greatest tire maker, the greatest endurance race, and knowledgeable fans has no Grand Prix. It should have two, so should Germany, Italy, England, and Spain. The US should have two. Drop Malaysia, Bahrain, Singapore, Korea, and Abu Dhabi.

Abudabi

Remember that at one time some European countries had more than one F1 race per year. There once existed non-championship F1 races in Europe that also served as testing sessions. Thoughts?

Kimi Doesn’t Buy “Team” Concept

In the football book, North Dallas Forty, the quarterback, Phil Elliott, utters words that could easily apply to F1 or any other kind of professional racing. In a discussion about the team, he points out that ownership and management are the team, the players, like helmets and jockstraps, are the equipment.

As we mentioned last week, the Constructors Championship year end pot is about $700M. Red Bull has won the top prize of about $100M. Mercedes, Ferrari, and Lotus are fighting for second spot. Renault reportedly owes Kimi Raikkonen $15M in salary. They are in fourth place in the championship and it is reasonable to believe that when they began the year they believed that they would do better than fourth and could count on that Constructors Championship payout to defray Kimi’s salary. They will unquestionably pay him, but it will hurt like hell to do it if he doesn’t help them garner more points between now and year end. And if he does… he will be taking money away from Ferrari.

Raikkonen left the Abu Dhabi GP track early on Sunday. His car was damaged on the first lap and he couldn’t go on. He didn’t stick around to tell people how disappointed he was, or how badly he felt for the team that had worked so hard etc. Kimi is not a team player. Ferrari once bought him out of his three year contract after two years. He drove a Citroen in the WRC. He was not competitive and his departure was not mourned. He now leaves Lotus under a cloud to return to Ferrari who once paid him handsomely to make him go away.

Kimi Raikkonen

Kimi is a fantastic natural driving talent. He is not a student of the game, hates the PR work, and doesn’t take direction well at all. But give him a good car and he can be a winner… when so motivated. For the teams, the stakes are high and history shows that winning teams throw personal driver attachments out the window when a quicker driver walks through the door. The beloved Michael Schumacher was “promoted” when Ferrari felt they had a better team with Massa and Kimi. Kimi knows this and as long as he is capable of winning races he will be forgiven past transgressions and whatever shortcomings he may dream up in the future. But the minute he reaches his “sell by” date he will be gone. Kimi knows the difference between the team and the equipment.

Michael Keyser Returns to the Targa

Racing Demons

Michael Keyser raced his 911 in the Targa Florio in 1972. Subsequently, he featured the race in his excellent racing movie, The Speed Merchants. As featured in our MMR Newsletter, he has now published Racing Demons, an excellent history of Porsche at the Targa Florio. In our Short Stories he tells us about his trip to Sicily to launch his book. Enjoy.

Have a great weekend,

Peter Bourassa


Red Bull Gives You Wins

Posted on November 18, 2010 Comments (0)

Red Bull have won it all! And deservedly so.

Excited and exciting Seb Vettel wins Drivers Championship

Excited and exciting Seb Vettel wins Drivers Championship

The energy drink people at Red Bull have proven once again that unfettered money can beat the Fiats, Mercedes and Renaults of the world at what should be their game. Benetton were the last wholly owned non-automotive oriented team to win both Drivers and Constructors Championships and that was fifteen years ago.

But this was an interesting season. Not as much for the racing as for the people. We appear to have a group of drivers who have let their personalities shine through the corporate sponsorships and we find they are a diverse group.

The following are the impressions they left with me as the year ended.

Sebastian Vettel: His little-boy exuberance can be alternatively refreshing and annoying but there is no doubt that he can drive. He had the best car, he won the Championship and he really deserved it.

Mark Webber: Flashes of brilliance but not enough of them. Nobody ever thought he would accomplish what he did at his age and stage of his career. He has a sympathetic following but a dim future.

Hamilton: Quick and competitive. Somehow appears one dimensional. He will be better as he matures.

Alonso: Quick and competitive and smart. Interesting to see him being consoled by Ferrari after the race. I would have thought the check was enough. He has been with four teams in nine seasons.

Massa: Great guy who needs to step up his game. He is number 2 at Ferrari. The new Barrichello.

Button: In two years he has built a reputation for being smart, fast and easy on equipment. Moved from Mercedes at the right time and can give his teammate a run on any day. He was impressive this year.

Schumacher: Gave every aging F1 driver hope. Then dashed them with uncompetive drives. His crash on the first lap of the final race should be a message.

Rosberg: Quick and smart. Handled being Schumacher's teammate very well. He deserves a better team and car. I would love to see him at Red Bull.

Kubica: Very quick. Needs a top ride and then will be very, very competitive.

Kobiyashi: Exciting to watch and would be interesting to see what he could do in a better car.

Domenicali: The most refreshing team principal in years. After years of Dreary Ron and Silent John, he is a breath of fresh air.

The only difference between the cars is Adrian Newey and Renault power.

The last two races were good strategic battles on boring courses. If Abu Dhabi would have been the first race it would have been called a disaster for its lack of passing opportunities.

Formula One drivers are pretty evenly matched. Vettel had a car in which at least five other drivers could have won the championship.

A lot of people seem to speak for Red Bull but we never hear enough from the guy who really makes it all work, Adrian Newey.

Hopefully next year will see more teams competing at the front. Mercedes and Renault seem poised, Williams, less so, but could surprise. A few less boring Tilke tracks would help.

On to 2011, let the testing begin!