MMR Blog

MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on March 21, 2014 Comments (0)

Racing and punditry were in full song this week. In this issue we review two big races, another Denise McCluggage story and the Friday and Saturday of our Amelia Island Concours Adventure.

Australian GP — What we’ve got here is a failure… of technology.

The first F1 race of the new era and the year has concluded. Or has it? As they say at the horse track, the previously formidable Red Bull team did not win, was kicked out of place and probably wished they hadn’t showed… up.

Sebring; where except for twelve hours a year, time really does stand still

Sebring is an anachronism. It was an old airport when it was new racetrack that needed paving and after 62 years it is now an old racetrack that still needs paving. Yet there remains a mystique about the 12 Hour Race. Winning it is a major accomplishment. It has heritage well worth preserving and seemingly able to draw entrants prepared to overlook its physical shortcomings.

Denise is Back!

Denise is still in rehab in Albuquerque NM and getting stronger by the day. She thanks you all for your good wishes. Armed with an IPad and a hospital TV she shares her observations with us this week.

Climb to the Clouds!

In 2009, nine BMW enthusiasts who met online, did the first Climb to the Clouds. Each year it has expanded. Last year they had 75 attendees of which 40 were Bimmers. This year’s Climb to the Clouds Six is a four day tour of New Hampshire (you can jump in and out) that includes touring New Hampshire, a climb up Mt. Washington and a run on the 35.5 mile Kancamagus Highway. The Kanc is the Northeast’s answer to The Tail of the Dragon and if you haven’t done it yet, you must. The event benefits SurvivetheDrive.org, a driving school for teenagers run by MMR friend Bob Green. Check it out on the MMR Calendar.

Road to Amelia Part II: Friday – Saturday

The Friday drive to Amelia was not without its memorable moments. Somewhere in South Carolina in the mid afternoon it began to rain. At first it was just a light rain. My road companions were pickup trucks and semis. Nobody lifted. Older engines like mine like humidity and rain makes them run better. On the other hand, the wipers on a 308 don’t like rain.

This week’s Michael Furman image is of the Simeone Museum’s Type 57G Bugatti.

Next stop… Sunday’s Concours. See you next week.

Peter Bourassa


Australian GP: What we’ve got here is a failure… of technology

Posted on March 20, 2014 Comments (0)

The first F1 race of the new era and the year has concluded. Or has it? As they say at the horse track, the previously formidable Red Bull team did not win, was kicked out of place and probably wished they hadn’t showed… up.

Mercedes, who were impressive in pre-season testing, took the pole and the win in different cars. The pole car failed. Red Bull took second for a little while. Then we learned that while their technology worked, it didn’t conform. Driver Daniel Ricciardo was stripped of the position. That meant that second and third fell to McLaren, whose Lazarus-like resurrection from F1’s graveyard was really the only feel good story of the day. Ferrari, from which much is always expected, fell short again. While both cars finished in the top ten, it was not a glorious beginning to their season.

Despite all this, it was a rather entertaining race. And for many fans, that may be in part because the very heroes who failed have made F1 races a bit of a parade for the past four years. Vallterie Bottas, the young Williams driver, was fun to watch as he climbed up and down the positions ladder finished a surprising fifth despite losing a wheel and Nico Hulkenberg hounded Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso all afternoon to finish sixth.

The only real winner today was Mercedes. Although they could claim credit for supplying engines to the top three cars, the pole winning Mercedes engine failed. Nothing is perfect in paradise.