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MMR Community Newsletter

Posted on December 4, 2014 Comments (3)

Racing is over in the countries where winter has sway but in the land down under, the V8 Supercars are getting ready to roll. We are looking into it and will post their events on the MMR Motorsports Calendar when we have the information.

Once the holidays are behind us January will launch the MMR Community into the concours and auctions season. January in Scottsdale will be busy with both and our MMR Calendar below will give you an overview. As we get closer we will give you some idea of our plans to attend events in the new year.

F1. The Season that Never Ends

While American F1 commentators waxed rhapsodically about how exciting the past season has been, close to a million of the 5.3 million Germans who watched it in 2013 tuned out. Their country produced the team that won the Manufacturers Championship and the only serious contender for Driver’s Championship other than the British winner! In the US meanwhile, F1 popularity is reportedly “exploding”. Most of us would prefer our excitement to come from closer racing on the track than the game of “Angry Teammates”.

Meanwhile, back in the back room, the big boys are trying to figure out how to (1) divvy the loot so that more than four teams can compete all the time and making certain that their crown jewel, Ferrari, doesn’t implode or (2) figure out how to get Bernie and CVC to kick back some more of what they take out.It ain’t gonna be easy folks! But it may be more entertaining than watching another season of Mercedes domination and Ferrari in the doldrums.

Luca de Montezemolo, former Ferrari Chairman, now heads Alitalia Airlines. His replacement at Ferrari, Sergio Marchionne, has replaced recent Team Principal Marco Mattiacci with Maurizio Arrivabene (pictured). He has F1 political experience which is something neither his boss has, nor his predecessor had. Which probably explains exactly why he is there. This is no longer a game of technology and small fast men and increasingly boys.

F1 Engines

The F1 engine issue has yet to be resolved and only concessions to the agreed upon existing formula by Mercedes can change the deal. It is their edge and, understandably, they have little interest in change. New entry Honda is not constrained by this agreement and comes in with a clean slate. Question is, can their engine be more competitive than those produced by others? Based on results of the original outing at Abu Dhabi, they have a ways to go. And one must keep in mind that Honda’s historical commitment to F1 could only charitably be viewed as consistent. They once fielded a team, then they supplied an engine, then they fielded a team again, which is now the Mercedes team, and now they want to field an engine, again. And BTW, Honda car sales, in an up market, are down.

2015 IndyCar Schedule Released

Progress is being made at IndyCar. Though having next season end in August remains incomprehensible, not having it end at the dreaded Fontana track is a bonus. Sadly it remains on the schedule. Someone of influence obviously has power over good sense and is also not a driver. Verizon remain the series sponsor and the Penske team will run four cars in 2015. Simon Pagenaud will drive for them. That will be interesting to watch as he and now teammate, and former close friend, IndyCar Champion Will Power, will share the same equipment. Power is also rumored to have less than warm relations with often affable and often surly but always competitive and quick-tempered teammate, Yuan Pablo Montoya.  Montoya is a modern AJ Foyt. That leaves the aging but still quick Helio Castroneves, who gets along with everyone, as Power’s likely lunch companion this year. This will be a tough team to beat and neither Ganassi nor Andretti Racing looks to be their match. On the positive side, unlike F1, there are a number of small teams that can give the big boys (read money) a run on any given day. More on Indy in future weeks.

This week’s Michael Furman Image is a Porsche America Roadster from the book Porsche Unexpected.

Our Eye Candy is from editor/photographer Dom Miliano’s collection.

Our feature story is the first in a series of stories about sports cars of the sixties and this week’s chosen favorite is the Sunbeam Tiger.

Have a great weekend and don’t forget to encourage friends to subscribe to our Newsletter.

Peter Bourassa


Racing | IndyCar: Ends on a Whimper Not a Bang

Posted on September 4, 2014 Comments (0)

The IndyCar season came to a fast speedy, but listless, end last Saturday night in Fontana CA. Will Power is the new IndyCar Champion.

Tony Kanaan

He didn’t win the race and he didn’t have to. The race itself was interesting and Tony Kanaan deserved the win. But after all the hype about the championship, it lacked drama. All Power had to do was survive and be close to Helio Castroneves to win. In the end he beat him.

Helio was far more gracious in losing than Power was in winning and that will not serve Power well. The “gosh all I want to do is win” thing has to go away. Now he needs to be a Champion and class up.

The most interesting part of the marathon show was the interview the previously reticent Roger Penske gave to his former and at times least favorite employee, the now quite entertaining color commentator Paul Tracy. When asked what he looked for in a young driver he said: Three things. He must have won a race, he needs to be able to communicate with his engineers and he needs to be a saleable product to the sponsors. A basic and excellent formula.

The Penske Team won the championship fair and square but the Ganassi Team finished strong and the Andretti team, which dominated early, simply faded.

Auto Club Speedway logo

Unfortunately, the track determined the outcome of the race. Auto Club Speedway, once the title of a sixties pin-ball game is a horrible place to race. Built in 1997 by Roger Penske ISC group, the concept was to build a track that would rival Indy… only bigger and better. But it never worked out. The track turns out huge speeds but the surface is in such poor condition, it hasn’t been repaved in almost twenty years, that changing lanes at high speed is life threatening. The track is divided into five lanes separated by tar-filled lips that are not even or of the same consistency as the pavement. The whole track is simply dangerous.

This is not good racing, it shouldn’t be on the schedule let alone the final double points paying race. It highlights the biggest problem that the series has—poor quality tracks.

They have the teams, the drivers and even the rules to be the best series in the world. What they lack is real racing venues. Instead they have opted for circus circuits where they can terrify downtown sewer rats and race between makeshift highway barriers separating them from and cotton candy vendors and T-shirt stalls. Mercifully the Houston Parking Lot Grand Prix has been dumped, only eight more to go. Unfortunately, almost one half of their venues are a joke and the sooner they dump them the sooner they will become the serious series they once were under CART and are capable of being again.

Our humble suggestions: First—Forget South America, go to Europe; Dump downtown Toronto for two days of racing at Mosport; Drop Florida and Long Beach entirely. Go to Road Atlanta and Laguna Seca; Drop Detroit and go to Road America; Cancel Auto Club Debacle go to Montreal or Mont Tremblant.

Add four races in Europe and assume Spa and Monza are unavailable: Goodwood in England; Paul Ricard in France; Nurburgring in Germany; Portimao in Portugal.

What do you think?